Americans

  • February 4, 2021

    Science of the Heart and Stars

    In honor of Black History Month, I very much wanted to profile two wonderful Black American scientists who have greatly contributed to the advancement of humanity’s health and well-being and to our understanding of the universe! I’m speaking of none other than Progressive Pioneers Doctors Marie M. Daly and Neil deGrasse Tyson. Let’s take a look into the lives of these great Americans who make us all proud—for we are all one color: beautiful. Dr. Marie Daly STEM Revolution of Equal Opportunity When the 45th president signed into law the Hidden Figures Act honoring the four African‐American women who were instrumental in the success of NASA’s space race to the moon, we should not forget other accomplished women who have also contributed our nation’s scientific knowledge. One such venerated pioneer is Dr. Marie Maynard Daly. Dr. Daly was born in Queens, NY on April 16, 1921. She was the daughter of Ivan Daly (an immigrant from the British West Indies) and Helen Page of Washington DC. Her parents settled in the New York City area where Mr. Daly attended Cornell University in pursuit of a chemistry degree. Like her father, Dr. Marie Daly also chose to pursue a career in chemistry. She was spurred on by her grandfather’s extensive library of books about scientists and their scientific achievements. Dr. Daly graduated from Queens College magna cum laude with a BA in Chemistry. Due to labor shortages and the need for scientists during World War II, she was able to garner fellowships to study at both New York and Columbia Universities earning her a master’s and a Ph.D. (respectively). Daly’s first major publication was her thesis on the formation of pancreatic amylase on corn starch. From there, her scientific career soared. She was awarded a grant from the American Cancer Society...
  • November 26, 2020

    Giving Happy Thanks!

    Thanksgiving is a very important holiday. Ours was the first country in the world to make a national holiday to give thanks. Linus van Pelt, Chief Blue‐Plushie Blanket Officer at Peanuts Corp. and Charlie Brown’s Best Friend Happy almost Thanksgiving Day denizens of Digital Gotham! It’s almost time for that big day of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, American Football (from the NFL, collegiate, to high school), family debates around the dinner table, A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving, and of course THE TURKEY DINNER! In America, Thanksgiving Day has been a traditional holiday since President Abraham Lincoln made it official in 1863. The very first Thanksgiving celebration was held in autumn in 1621 in Plymouth Massachusetts between the pilgrim settlers of The Mayflower and the Wampanoag tribe of Native Americans. Though no turkeys were actually served then, just a meal of deer, venison, geese, oysters, lobster, eel and fish and probably pumpkins. Thanksgiving in America is always celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November (that’s also thanks to President Lincoln). And The NFL began the Thanksgiving Classic Games in 1920, which started the whole football aspect to the holiday. It may also surprise you to learn that Canada’s first Thanksgiving celebration actually predates America’s—by more than 40 years! In 1578, an expedition led by the English navigator Martin Frobisher held a ceremony in what is now Nunavut, giving thanks for the safety of their fleet. This is considered the first‐ever Thanksgiving celebration in North America, and it is celebrated on the second Monday in October. Though in fact, First Nations (the indigenous peoples of Canada) and Native Americans tend to refer to it as You’re Welcome Weekend. However, what most people probably think of most when it comes to this venerated holiday is…Black Friday…NO! The food. At least that’s what Digital...